Archive for the ‘green economy’ Tag

Wind farm in Champaign County gets green light from Ohio Power Siting Board

More good news for renewable energy – and jobs – in Ohio:

COLUMBUS – The Ohio Power Siting Board approved a certificate Monday to allow construction of 53 of 70 wind turbines proposed for eastern Champaign County by New York-based developer, EverPower Renewables.

via Wind farm OK’d (Urbana Citizen)

Of the 17 turbines that were not approved, all but two were rejected due to safety concerns, as they interfered with the flight space requirements for a nearby airfield. Two others were denied because they did not meet the minimum property setback.

All in all, this is good news for the citizens of Champaign County and Ohio. The Buckeye Wind development will be the first commercial-scale wind farm in Ohio, and long overdue.

Dell steps up green wars with bamboo boxes | Electronista

Dell Minis to ship in bamboo packaging

updated 11:45 am EST, Tue November 17, 2009

Dell today boasted an industry first by becoming the first to ship its computers in bamboo packaging. The Mini 10 and 10v will have boxes made primarily of the more efficient material, which regrows much faster than the trees used for cardboard and is more easily renewable. As it takes as much stress as steel, it even provides more protection and replaces not just cardboard but also the foam normally used to cushion against an impact.

via Dell steps up green wars with bamboo boxes | Electronista.

Incorporating renewable materials that provide superior protection into packaging – and using it to win customers? Sounds like a no-brainer.

Where The Green Jobs Are – How to Find Them, How to Get Them

Want to find a job in green energy? Here you go. You’re welcome.

This map of renewable energy and energy efficiency companies from the Environmental Defense Fund is just plain cool:

The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) recently published an online map that identifies and profiles more than 1,200 companies in key manufacturing states that they see as poised create new jobs when Congress passes a cap on global warming pollution. The interactive map spotlights companies located in manufacturing regions, including those in communities in the rust belt and coal country.

via Where The Jobs Are – Interactive Tools Tells You Where to Look | The Green Economy Post: Green Careers, Green Jobs, Sustainable Jobs.

Now you know where to look. All you need are the skills. If you’ve wanted to make a career change, but weren’t sure if you had the right background and training, this free seminar from Green Career Central can help.

“NOW is the Time to Prepare for Your Green Career”
Wednesday, October 14, 2009
6 – 7 pm Pacific Time

Green Career Expert and author of the upcoming “Green Careers for Dummies,” Carol McClelland, will reveal five actions you can take right NOW to move toward your green career – even in an economy that is shifting and growing.

Click here to find out more and to sign up for the teleclass.

As I have mentioned before, the renewable energy sector has been adding jobs – even during the recession. If you’ve been thinking about making a change, this is a good opportunity to see what steps you need to take to start your career in the green economy.

Bring more jobs to Ohio the goal of solar energy tour

More news on renewable energy from Ohio:

DAYTON — The hope that new manufacturing jobs follow a broadening base of renewable energy sources is the message of this weekend’s Ohio Solar Tour throughout 91 communities, including Dayton.

via Bring more jobs to Ohio the goal of solar energy tour | Dayton Daily News.

The Ohio Solar Tour is being organized by the good folks at Green Energy Ohio – the same outfit that got the Lake Erie Wind project rolling. More on that in a bit.

For me, the really exciting news comes at the end of the piece, detailing some of the larger wind, solar, and biomass projects underway:

Biomass:

On Friday, Oct. 2, Cherokee Run Landfill in Logan County will host a community open house for its new 4.8 megawatt landfill gas project. The landfill consists in part of trash from the Dayton area.

The new facility will generate enough power for 2,800 homes, according to developers DTE Biomass Energy and Shaw Environmental Inc.

Solar:

What will be one of the larger solar energy fields in the eastern United States will be built on 83 acres outside Upper Sandusky in Wyandot County.

Construction begins in November on the project that will use more than 165,000 panels built by First Solar Inc., which has a manufacturing plant in Perrysburg. It should be completed in summer 2010 and be able to power about 1,500 homes.

Wind:

A major project that could dot Champaign County’s landscape with wind turbines is moving forward, with public hearings on the proposed sites set for late October. It would include building more than 70 wind turbines across six townships in Champaign County where Ohio’s highest elevations are located.

LakewoodAlive to host forum on wind energy feasibility in Lake Erie – cleveland.com

From the Sun News (Cleveland):

Great Lakes Energy Development Task Force members will discuss the possibility of wind energy in Lake Erie at 7 p.m. Sept. 30 at Harding Middle School, 16601 Madison Ave in Lakewood.

The results of the initial feasibilty study were made public in May (see Wind power initiative on Lake Erie passes feasibility test). Estimates for the next stage of the demonstration project – deployment of turbines in a pilot project – range from $77 million to $93 million.

Ford Truck Plant to Retool to Build Electric Cars

The New York Times’ Green Inc. blog is reporting that Ford will spend half a billion dollars to retool one of its factories to produce an all-electric verson of the Ford Focus:

Amidst one of the auto industry’s largest wholesale shifts in modern history, the Ford Motor Company is investing $550 million to turn a factory that was dedicated to making large and fuel-hungry sport utility vehicles into a modern and scalable small-car plant that will eventually produce an all-electric version of the Focus.

The Michigan Assembly Plant, known as one of the world’s most profitable manufacturing sites during the S.U.V. boom of the 1990s, was once the hub for the Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigator. The plant is expected to begin building the new Ford Focus next year, followed by production of the all-electric Focus in 2011.

via Ford Truck Plant to Build Electric Cars – Green Inc. Blog – NYTimes.com.

This is great news, if a little late. I wonder how much of the impetus to produce an all-electric version of the Focus comes as one of the strings from the auto bailout, and how much comes from Ford execs noticing the popularity of the Prius and the incredible response to the mere announcement of the Chevy Volt.

Whatever the reason, it’s about time.

Vestas Creates 2,500 Green Jobs

Here’s some good news for the industry and the economy in general, from MyGreen Education and Career:

Vestas opened its first North American manufacturing plant in Windsor earlier this year. The 650-employee facility will produce 1,800 giant wind blades a year.

The new Brighton facilities, which should be operational by July 1, 2010, will include:

* A $180 million blade-manufacturing facility that will produce 1,800 blades a year and provide 650 new jobs.

* A $110 million nacelle assembly factory ( to be their largest in the world) that will produce 1,400 nacelles a year and provide 700 new jobs.

* A Technology and Production Engineering Office.

All told, Vestas’ entire commitment to Colorado represents a nearly $700 million capital investment and 2,450 new jobs

The 178-acre site is located in unincorporated Weld County and will be annexed into Brighton. Vestas is purchasing 112 acres from Brighton and 66 acres from RTD, which obtained the land from the Union Pacific Railroad.

In addition, Vestas intends to build the world’s largest tower-manufacturing facility elsewhere in Colorado; the exact location has not yet been announced.

All told, Vestas’entire commitment to Colorado represents a nearly $700 million capital investment and 2,450 new jobs.

via Vestas Creates 2500 Green Jobs in the North American Wind Industry | MyGreen Education and Career.

That’s 2,400 direct jobs. Many more will be supported and created in direct and indirect suppliers and related businesses: steel producers, trucking, energy, telecommunications, entertainment…

Hello world!

Some explanation about myself: I am not usually this serious, but I take energy independence really seriously. So I am going to try really really hard to be serious on this blog. My goofy side is on display enough places anyway.

Anyway: about me. I’m concerned about the environment, but don’t consider myself an environmentalist – and definitely not a tree-hugger.

I’m concerned about the possibility of global warming, but I don’t know enough to say either “We need to act NOW” or “It’s all a lot of hand-waving.” Kind of the same way I feel about UFOs – I know enough to say I don’t know.

The T. Boone Pickens plan to replace the fuel for our vehicles with natural gas (hopefully, produced domestically) and replace natural-gas-powered power plants with renewable (specifically wind) energy strikes me as bold, visionary, and incomplete. More on that later. To sum up: it’s a good place to start a discussion about national energy policy.

I am encouraged by the effort underway by elected offficials in Cuyahoga County to assess the feasibility of
commercial-scale wind generation in Lake Erie, but concerned that they’re missing the larger picture. More on that later, too. To sum up: should county government be trying to pick the winner in the renewable energy lottery, and is the goal to lessen dependence on coal-fired plants for generation or to reinvigorate NE Ohio’s manufacturing sector? Those goals aren’t entirely compatible.

Anyway, here’s my point: reasonable people can disagree, hopefully without being disagreeable. If climate change is real, if energy independence deserves to be a national priority, if refocusing national energy policy on renewables is a sound strategy for economic growth or environmental protection or both then Americans ought to be able to find some consensus on  those issues. Note that I said “consensus,” not “agreement.”

So here we go!